GUT researchers are investigating memory mechanisms

The Foundation for Polish Science has presented five discoveries from Polish laboratories that will help to better understand the brain, the most mysterious and fascinating organ in the human body. Among them were research on memory mechanisms conducted by PhD Michał Kucewicz's team at the Laboratory of Brain and Mind Electrophysiology at the Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics of Gdańsk University of Technology.

 

PhD Michał Kucewicz, together with a team consisting of neurobiologists, physicists, biomedical engineers and doctors, is investigating memory mechanisms and possibilities of electrical stimulation of its disorders as part of the project 'Neurophysiological mapping and stimulation of the human brain for memory improvement', financed by FPS under the FIRST TEAM program. The team is looking for answers to the questions: What is memory?, Where is it located in the brain? and How can it be effectively treated in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other memory disorders?.

In their research, scientists use the latest technologies to measure and stimulate electrical brain waves. The project combines eye tracking technologies with technologies for recording neural activities for direct electrical brain stimulation during memory testing.

– Such measurement and stimulation of the electrical activity of neurons during memory processes in humans are technically very difficult, due to their micro-size and limited access to the brain. That is why we use rare cases of electrode implantation in patients with epilepsy and movement disorders. Patients are asked to perform tasks displayed on the screen, e.g. to remember words. While they perform these tasks, we measure electrical activity in their brains in specific regions, while using technology to track eye pupil movements. The use of new generation electrodes used directly in the brain gives us the clearest and most reliable data. We are also looking at how sending electrical impulses to specific brain regions can improve patients' memory and task performance. – PhD Kucewicz told the Foundation for Polish Science.

The project is implemented in cooperation with the Mayo Clinic in the United States, the Medical University in Wroclaw, the Medical University of Gdańsk and the Marcel Nencki PAS Institute of Experimental Biology in Warsaw.

More about brain research supported by the Foundation for Polish Science presented on the occasion of the European Brain Day (March 18) can be found - HERE.

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